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 How to get here / around
 
The town is 7 km from the Siem Reap-Angkor International Airport (IATA code REP). Siem Reap is accessible by direct flights from Phnom Penh, Sihanoukville, Singapore, Bangkok,Kuala Lumpur, Vientiane, Luang Prabang, Hanoi, Ho Chi Minh City, Da Nang, Hong Kong,Guangzhou, Seoul-Incheon, Pusan, Kunming, Kaohsiung and Taipei, and by land from Phnom Penh and the Thai border. It’s also accessible by boat and bus from Phnom Penh.
 
Get in
By plane
Siem Reap - Angkor International Airport (IATA: REP |ICAO: VDSR) is the second largest airport in Cambodia.
 
The following airlines operate service to/from Angkor International Airport:
 
AirAsia (Kuala Lumpur), Asiana Airlines (Seoul-Incheon), Bangkok Airways (Bangkok), Cambodia Angkor Air (Ho Chi Minh City, Phnom Penh), China Eastern Airlines (Kunming, Nanning), China Southern Airlines (Guangzhou), Jetstar Asia (Singapore), Korean Air (Seoul-Incheon), Lao Airlines (Luang Prabang), Malaysia Airlines (Kuala Lumpur), Silk Air (Da Nang, Singapore), and Vietnam Airlines (Hanoi, Ho Chi Minh City,Luang Prabang).
 
The airport is less than 15 minutes from the town centre by taxi ($7) or motodop ($4). If you have an advance booking in a hotel, ask the hotel for a free airport pickup (in one of their tuk-tuks).
 
There are separate terminals for international and domestic flights. International departure tax is a steep $25, or $13 for children, payable after check-in and before clearing immigration. Note that usually this must be paid in cash because the credit card facility is unreliable, so have cash with you. Domestic departure tax to Phnom Penh is $6.
 
By land
Phnom Penh Sorya Transport Capitol Tours, and GST Express operate bus service to/from Siem Reap. Direct buses go to Phnom Penh ($10), Pakse ($30), Don Det in the 4000 Islands region of Laos ($27), Kampong Cham, Soung, Battambang, and Kor Kong. Advance bookings are advisable, and can also be sorted out by most travel agents and guesthouses for a $1-$2 fee. Buses generally leave between 7:00AM and 3:00PM.
 
From Thailand, the nearest border crossings are at Aranyaprathet/Poipet, 3 hours to the north, and Hat Lek/Koh Kong on the coast. See those articles for information on how to get to and cross the border. As a result of recent road pavings, the roads from these border crossings to Siem Reap are in excellent condition. From Poipet, you can take a taxi (US$25 minimum, 2-3 hours, max 4 passengers) or an overcrowded bus (US$10, 6 hours, leaves when full, not as comfortable).
 
The best budget option is to catch a Thai government bus to the border at Poi Pet (don't buy from Khao San Road), buy the Cambodian visa directly for $20, then after being stamped into the country find yourself a group of four to catch a reasonably comfortable taxi to Siem Reap ($25-30). This will get you to Siem Reap on time, in comparable comfort without funding scammers.
 
Alternatively, you could join the backpacking masses and pay 200-600 baht for an uncomfortable bus ride directly from Khao San Road. WE STRONGLY RECOMMEND AGAINST THESE TICKETS. Buses leave Khao San Road around 8AM and arrive in Siem Reap any time between 5:00PM and 3:00AM. The trip length does not really depend on road conditions but on the mood of the driver. Because he gets a commission if you stay at the guesthouse at which he drops you off, he will try to arrive there as late as possible because if you are tired and afraid of walking around in Siem Reap late at night, you are more likely to stay at that guesthouse. Note that there is no obligation to stay at such guesthouse, regardless of what the guesthouse owners tell you. Even if you start in Bangkok on a big aircon bus, you will almost certainly have to switch to the back of a pickup or stuffed minibus at the Cambodian border. The bus operators and others will assure you that you're better off paying 1,000 baht ($30) or even more for the visa - which should cost $20. Stand your ground and join the line at the border - the bus won't leave without you, because the driver wants the guesthouse commission you represent. As an alternative, you can always walk from the bus stop to the Thai border exit - just keep aware of your surroundings to avoid being pickpocketed or inadvertently walking into a fake border crossing.
 
By boat
A more expensive and more time consuming option from Phnom Penh ($35, 8 hours) or Battambang ($20-$25, 5 hours) is to take a Soviet style Hydrofoil across the Tonle Sap lake. These can be fantastic trips giving you the opportunity to view life on the lake, floating houses, working fishermen, and to get a sun-tan if you choose to sit on the roof of the boat. However, the trip can be ruined due to bad weather. Remember to use sunscreen and take a waterproof jacket. You will not be able to access your luggage during the journey. It should also be noted that these hydrofoils are polluting an important lake for bird life. If you have the time, it is better to visit the floating villages as day trips from Siem Reap than to see them from the boat.
 
Get around
Travel to and around the Angkor Archaeological Park is extensively covered in its own article. The following is a discussion of travel with Siem Reap.
 
On foot
Most of the sights in Siem Reap can be seen on foot. But be aware that most of the streets around town degrade into small swamps of muddy water and potholes of unknown depth following rain (almost daily in the wet season), making the roads a challenge to navigate.
 
By bicycle
Many guesthouses will lend you bicycles either for free or for a nominal charge.
 
By motorbike
You'll have plenty of transportation offers from motodops (motorbike taxi with driver). Rides within town should only cost $1, although prices can double to $2 at night and during bad weather. Agree on a price first and hop on the back. You can also hire a motodop for a full day for ~$10. Some motodops may be able to provide you with a helmet if you request one in advance.
 
The rental of motorbikes to tourists in Siem Reap is prohibited. However, foreigners can ride motorbikes they have rented elsewhere such as in Phnom Penh).
 
By tuk-tuk
Within Siem Reap, tuk-tuk rides should cost $2, with prices doubling to $4 at night and during bad weather. Tuk-tuks are ubiquitous. If you plan to stay in Siem Reap for a few days, it can also be a good idea to build a relationship with one tuk-tuk driver as once they know you they will quite often take you to places off the regular tourist route and allow you to experience the "real" Siem Reap.
 
A word of advice: pay them for their services only after everything you have arranged is completed. For example, if you arrange for a later trip to the airport and pay them beforehand, chances are that they will not show up. Although you can also bargain on the fees, remember that an extra dollar or two is a great deal of money for your driver and his family.

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